The Reporter
ssue 492, 29 September 2003
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Work better together

 

The university is introducing a new email and calendaring system for staff based on Microsoft Exchange and Outlook. This is in response to demand for improved collaborative working and web access and follows a period of extensive user consultation. Indeed, one of the key aims of the University IT/IS strategy is to 'use resources and processes to positively encourage collaboration and shared service delivery'. The Outlook/Exchange project aims to roll out the new system to approximately 6000 members of staff who have access to a PC over the next 12 months. This will involve installing Outlook 2002 on desktops, configuring existing Outlook users to connect to the new Exchange infrastructure and migrating users’ email to the new service.

It is important that we migrate all ISS Novell-based Pegasus mail users by 31 March 2004 as that service will be decommissioned in order to upgrade our home directory servers. We hope to migrate all other users across by June 2004.
The project will deliver a number of key benefits both to the University and to each user. For the University, Outlook/Exchange offers excellent value for money, achieved through economies of scale, providing a centrally-managed and fault-tolerant 'generic' mail system. Eventually the University will see huge savings through improved time and resource scheduling – just think how long it took you/your department to arrange that last departmental meeting, for example!

Personally, Outlook will help you to better organise your working week, indeed your whole digital life. It will enable you to work more closely with your colleagues; to literally 'work better together'. Outlook offers easier ways to plan meetings and advanced ways to manage your email. You can even work away from your desk… Outlook web access gives users access to their e-mail, contacts and diaries from a web browser, from anywhere.

The project has started to run a number of 'roadshows' to explain what is happening, outline the benefits and to demonstrate some of the key features. There will be a roadshow happening near you soon.

The project will also provide training. Everyone can have a copy of the user documentation, either in printed form or electronically. There is also a web-based training package which either runs as a full course from the basics upwards, or you can dip in and out of it as a refresher/skills improver. We hope to train up to 600 'super-users' on campus to an advanced level of using Outlook, so that you will never be far from some local expertise. In addition, the ISS help desk will also be on hand to offer support and assistance.

So how can you help us to help you get onto the new system? Well, we are working with your faculty/school/department to roll-out Outlook/Exchange in line with their own IT strategy and policy. You will have plenty of warning when we will want to migrate you and your colleagues across but you can help prepare for the migration now. Please start off by carrying out some basic housekeeping tasks on your mailbox: deleting unwanted emails and sent items (especially those with attachments); sorting through mail folders; updating your address books; and archiving older emails away from your current inbox.

 

 
 


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