Reporter 450, 3 April 2000


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Press Release- 25 March 2000

Leeds Medical Students Teacher of the Year Awards 1999/2000

For the first time this year Leeds medical students held their teacher of the year awards. The awards were voted for by students from the across the years and the winners were picked for their ability to inspire enthusiasm in the medical students they come into contact with. They were organised by the Medical Students Representative Council (MSRC) to pick out the lecturers and the doctors that show their willingness to go a little further in providing the highest quality education for Leeds’ future doctors. The awards were presented at the medical school annual dinner dance at the Craiglands Hotel, Ilkley by the President and Vice President of MSRC Chris Peters and Kate Boddy, both third year medical students. Chris Peters was quoted as saying that ‘the students feel its important to show their appreciation to all the teachers in the university and hospitals who put huge amounts of effort into inspiring the medical students often without obvious reward.’

The winners of the competition were Dr Andy Hill (lecturer in Behavioural Sciences) who teaches 1st and 2nd years, Professor Bill Cunliffe (a Dermatologist at the LGI) who was voted 4th year hospital teacher of the year and Dr Nigel Cooke (a respiratory physician at the LGI) who was voted for as overall hospital teacher of the year.

Dr Andy Hill was noted for his ability to inspire the early years with his lectures with countless years of students remembering his contribution to their education with huge fondness. On receiving his award he said ‘University teaching is more than cramming facts into students heads. We work hard to maintain their interest and willingness to learn in a variety of ways and contexts. Its really good that the students have taken it on themselves to accentuate the positives in medical education at Leeds. The only downside of receiving the first such award is living up to the high expectations of future students.’

Professor Bill Cunliffe was singled out for his utter dedication to bringing alive his subject to students and his and his teams superb quality of teaching. He said ‘It is important to look at the positive side of things as well as the negative, awards like these are important to the individual and the team to highlight good practice and to show appreciation.’

Dr Cooke teaches mainly 3rd and 5th years on the wards in the LGI and was selected for his ability to make all students feel welcome and completely part of his team. He said ‘I think it is a privilege for consultants to teach the next generation of doctors and they should consider undergraduate teaching to be second only to their patient duties. I am delighted to have been voted clinical teacher of the year 1999/2000.’

Professor Cottrell (Director of Teaching and Learning at Leeds Medical School) supported the awards and said ‘The School of Medicine is very lucky to have not only so many good teachers but also students who take an active interest in the teaching they receive. In addition to these awards, our students work very closely with us on course development, ensuring that the training we provide really does meet the needs of future doctors. My congratulations go to Drs Hill and Cooke and to Professor Cunliffe for their consistently outstanding teaching but I would also like to thank all the other teachers in the School and in the local NHS who contribute to training doctors in Leeds.’

The contact details of the winners and Professor Cottrell are below and all are willing to be contacted for a quote.

Dr. A.J. Hill - 0113 233 2734.

Dr. N.J. Cooke - 0113 392 3328.

Prof. W.J. Cunliffe - 0113 392 3605.

Prof. David Cottrell - 0113 295 1760.

If you have any questions about the awards please do not hesitate in contacting me also.

Yours Sincerely,


Chris Peters

MSRC President 1999-2000

Telephone- 0113 247 1807

Mobile- 0403 945127

E-mail- ugm6cjp@leeds.ac.uk


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